when behaviour is stigmatised

We all behave. We all use behaviour as a form of communication. We all have opinions about other peoples behaviour. We all make assumptions about what constitutes “good” and “bad” behaviour. In the context of disability support, behaviour is a much discussed topic, and very often the word “behaviour” is preceded by the word “challenging” or followed by the word “management”. More and more though, I want to precede or follow the word “behaviour” with the word “stigmatised”.

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autistic anxiety

It’s great that as a society we are becoming more aware of mental health challenges and the impact they have on peoples lives. Words like depression, and anxiety are part of our conversations now, and the stigma around them is reducing. But there is still some misunderstanding about what they actually are, and even more so when we mention anxiety in neurodivergent people. 

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5 ways to support someone through a meltdown

“Meltdown” is a pretty commonly used phrase these days. When I use it I don’t just mean that I lost my shit because something didn’t go my way. I am referring to the frightening, overwhelming, out of control experience of an overload induced meltdown. We most commonly refer to children as having meltdowns, but autistic (and other wise neurodivergent) adults experience them too.

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meltdown

{ In this this post I describe my experience of a sensory overload induced meltdown. It may be triggering for some people. }

everything is suddenly louder. it was loud before but now it’s like there is an extra megaphone inside my head and it hurts when a sound flows through it. hurts in my whole body. right to my core. and ricocheting back out again to my skin.

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Sensory overload

Sensory overload is becoming a commonly used term, and not just in groups of neurodivergent people. In this article, I’m going to talk briefly about the sensory systems humans have, and then talk to you about how I experience sensory overload as an autistic person. 

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Resolutions

A new year. My Facebook newsfeed is full of good wishes and memes advising me to ensure I make the most of a new chance. The good wishes I’ll take happily, but the challenge to resolve to do something ‘more’ or ‘better’ with my life I’m happy to leave. 

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